Making a 3D Pretzel – Part 1 – Blender for Beginners


Hey what’s up, this is Chris Plush from
CGmasters.net. And in the first part of this two-part series on creating a soft
pretzel, we’re gonna be modeling everything in this scene. I’ll take you
through the modeling step-by-step, and you’ll learn about using both curves and
meshes, as well as using modifiers such as subsurf. We’re also going to be using
particle systems to place salt all over the pretzel, plate, and the table. Now if
you’re brand new to blender then I recommend checking out our free primer
series on our website. You can find the link to that in the description. Now the
first thing you need to do for this tutorial is download the pretzel
reference image from the link in the description. We’ll be putting this in
blenders background to use as basically blueprints for creating the pretzel. So
once you’ve gotten that saved to your computer then we can get started. All
right here we go. Now the first thing I want to do is go into top orthographic
view. Right now we’re in a rotated perspective view. So let me press
numpad 5 to switch it to orthographic, which as you can see gives us more of a
flat view of the scene. And I’ll press numpad 7 for top view. And let’s also
press the T key to get rid of the left side toolbar. And now I think I want to
delete everything in the scene and just start blank. So I’ll press A once or
twice until everything is highlighted, then press X and delete everything. Then
I’ll press the end N key for the right side toolbar. We’re going to load in that
pretzel image in the background now. So let me go over here, toward the bottom
there’s a panel called background images. So I’ll just expand that, click on add
image, and then click on open. And now navigate to wherever you saved your pretzel
image, and let’s load in pretzel reference. And there we go.
Now right now you can see the axis here is showing it in all views. If you click on
that you have other options. Let’s just put this in top view. So I’ll
select top, that way it’s only gonna show up in top view. And now we can press the
N key again to get rid of a toolbar and get some more room to work with. So what
I’m going to do now is add a curve object, and we’re gonna use those curves
to trace the shape of the pretzel. But right now my 3d cursor seems to be awol. Ah, it’s all the way up there for some reason.
And wherever the 3d cursor is is where a new object is added in. So I want to
place that right, right back in the center of the world. So to do that I’ll
press Shift + S and choose cursor to center. So now our cursor is right in the
middle of the pretzel, and we can add that curve in. So now I’ll press Shift
and A for the add menu, and from the curves sub-menu I’ll add in a circle. Now
let me Tab into edit mode, and from edit mode we can edit each
individual point of this and actually shape the pretzel. And all of them are
already selected. So what I’ll do now is press S and scale that up to be the
right height of the pretzel like that. And right now we have an enclosed circle
so we can’t exactly create this shape here, because it’s open on both ends. So
what I’m going to do is delete the segments on the right side, and then
we’re just going to shape the left side, and then we’ll flip that over to the
other side and have our, our full pretzel. So let me right click in the middle of
that point up there, I’ll hold Shift, right click in the middle of that one,
and that one, and now I’ll press X, and I’ll erase the segment’s between them. So
that gives us just half of that circle left here. And obviously we have some
editing to do to get the correct shape of the pretzel. So let me right click on
that middle point to select it, then I’ll move it by pressing G, and then press Y
to move it just on the Y-Axis, and we’ll move it down to the middle of the
pretzel right there. And we’ll do the same thing down here. I’ll right click in
the middle of that, then I’ll press G, and then Y, move it up to the middle of the
thickness right there. So now let me show you how to actually edit the curve to
get the right shape for the pretzel. So the middle points we’ve been clicking on
are called control points. You can select them and press G and move around the
whole thing. Then the points on the end are called handles. You can right click
on one of them. So let’s right-click on that one, and then press G, and it’ll
reshape the curve around it like that. So that’s how we’re going to get the
correct shape for the pretzel. So I’ll drop this one right about there. Our goal
right now is to get the whole curve in the middle of the pretzel all the way
around the left side. So let me right click on that control
point, I’ll press G, and I’ll move it up here, right in the middle of the
thickness there. Then select this handle right there,
press G, and move it down and around until that curve is nice and centered
all the way up. And now let me select this handle here, press G and move it up
to shape the top of the pretzel there. How does that look? I think that’s looking
pretty good, let me just move that one around a little bit. And yeah. Move the
control point down and to the left a little bit. Just trying to get that
centered in the middle of pretzel as good as possible. Although it’s not really
that necessary because pretzel is not exactly a perfect shape. All right so
we’re definitely off to a good start now. So now what we need to do is take this
control point and extend it down to the tip of the pretzel over here. So let me
right click on that control point, and we’ll use a tool called extrude.
So let’s select that and then press E to extrude it. Which basically just extends
it down to a new point. And we’ll drop that right in the middle of pretzel
there. And let me select, let me right-click on that handle right there, I’ll press G, and
I’ll swing it around over there, and then left click to drop it there, and then
let’s right-click on that control point, and we’ll extrude it down all the way to
the tip. So let me press E, and I’ll extrude it all the way down and to right
there. And now let’s do a little bit of reshaping. So I’ll right-click on that
handle, press G, and move it down like that. And let’s get a better idea of what the
curve looked like, looks like so far. So let me press Tab to get out of edit mode.
And this gives us a better idea of what the curve looks like without all those extra
lines. And that’s looking pretty good. Maybe we can just soften it up a little
bit in there. So let me select that control point, press G, and move it down
a little bit, select that handle, press G and move it up a little bit. And that
softens it up a little bit more. Alright so we got half the pretzel made already.
Now I want to flip this to the other side. So let me press Tab to go back into
edit mode. And I’ll press A once or twice until all the control points are
selected. And what I’m gonna do is duplicate this and flip it to the other
side based on the 3d cursors position. So if you accidentally clicked away, and the 3d
cursor’s misplaced. Then just simply press Shift and S, and choose cursor to center
to place that back in the center. Now to make sure that this mirrors around the
3d cursor, and not the middle of the selection, which is default. Let’s go down
into the header of the 3d view and go into the pivot point menu. The pivot
point is basically the point around which an object or a selection rotates
or scales, and it’s typically like I said in the middle of the selection. But let’s
change the pivot point to 3d cursor in this case. So we can mirror it right
around the cursor in the center. So now what we’ll do is press Shift + D to
duplicate these points, and right click to keep them in their original position,
then press Ctrl + M for the mirror hotkey. And you can see in the bottom
left of the 3d view we now have to select a mirror axis. So let’s press the
X key to select X as the axis to mirror on, and then press ENTER to confirm that.
And there we go, we have a full pretzel now. So now what we’ll do is just edit
the right side so it matches the blueprints more and things are less
symmetrical. But the first thing we need to do is deal with the situation down
here. When we mirrored it, these two control points didn’t merge together. So
if select one of them, move it away, you can
see there’s going to be a gap between them. So what we’ll do to merge them is
just right-click on either one of those control points, then press X, and erase the
vertex. It leaves us with a gap between these two control points. So what we’ll
do is just fill that in with a segment. So I’ll right-click on that control
point, hold Shift, and right click on that one, and then simply press F to create a
segment between them. And now we can get to work shaping the right side. Now we’ll
do the same thing we did with the left side. We’ll just select control points,
move them around to the middle of the pretzel thickness, and then play with the
handles until we get the correct shape. So let me right click on that control point,
press G, move it over and up a little bit, to the center like that. And that fix,
that fixes the curve at the top as well. And let me right-click on that control
point, press G, and move it to the left, and I’ll select this one, press G and move it
up. And how’s that curve looking? Let me select that handle, press G, and move it in like that, then I’ll select that handle and move it out like that. Let me take this one,
press G, and move it up to the center there. And this kind of curls upward and then
down. So I’ll select that handle, press G move it up. Same thing with this one. And
then let me Tab out of edit mode and see how things look. Look, looks pretty
good up and around, and over like that. That looks good. We already know the left
side looks good. All right so there is my final pretzel curve shape. All right
let’s turn this into an actual 3d pretzel now. So right now I’m in
object mode, if you’re in edit mode still then press Tab to get out, so we can more
easily see our curves. And let’s go over to the options over here, let’s click on
this icon for object data. This gives us a bunch of different options we can
change to edit our curve. In particular, we’re gonna be using the option called
bevel depth right here. If I left click on that field and drag it to the right,
you can see it’s actually giving our curve some 3d to it. So let me rotate the
view. You can see right now it’s only filling in half. So we want the other
side as well. For, you know, a full round pretzel. So let’s go up to the fill
option up here. Right now it’s set to 1/2. Let’s change that to full. And there we
go. And right now it’s a square, so we need
to increase the resolution, so we get a nice circle around this. So let’s go over
to the bevel resolution right here. I’ll click on the right arrow until we get,
let’s go with a resolution of 5, that should be good for now.
And all right, it’s shaping up into something actually 3d now. So let me press
numpad 7 for top view. And let’s add a little bit more thickness to this, and
then we’ll shape it a little bit better to match the reference. And now, one thing
I should mention, if you go into top view and you no longer see the
blueprints in the background, you might be in perspective view. And you can
double check in the top left here. Mine says top orthographic, and orthographic
view is the only type of view that blueprints will show up on. If I press
numpad 5 to toggle between perspective and orthographic. You can see that top
perspective view isn’t showing me my blueprints. So I’ll press numpad 5 to go
back to orthographic, and there they are. Alright let’s get back on track by
adding more thickness to this to better match the reference. So I’ll go back over
to the bevel depth option, left click on that, and drag it to the right until we
have the right thickness. So it looks like something around 0.7 actually looks
perfect, so I’ll leave it there. Now back over in the 3d view, if we Tab into edit
mode, now we can edit the right side or left side, and just make things match up
with the blueprints better if we want to. But I actually think everything looks
good as is on my end. So I’m gonna move on to interweaving the intersections we
have going on here. So to actually interweave this, we’re gonna move some of
the control points up or down on the Z-Axis, depending on how the actual
pretzel’s interweaved. So let’s actually double check that. Let me press the N
key for the right side toolbar, I’ll scroll down to the background images
here, and let me click on that border there, and drag it to left so we can see
more of this. And let’s change the option from back to front, and that will draw
the reference image on top of anything we have in the scene. So now you can see
the right arm here goes underneath at this intersection there, and
then it goes above these two intersections here. Alright so I’ll
remember that. And we’re pretty much done with the reference image now. So what
I’m gonna do is click on that checkbox there to disable it. And then over the 3d
view, I’ll press the N key to get rid of the right side toolbar, and now we can
get started. Now back over in the 3d view, let me press Shift + Space to go into
full screen and just give us a little more room to work with. And let me point
out something real quick. Make a note that I’ve placed these control points in
the general areas of the intersections, because I knew we would be moving them
up or down. So having points in those areas just gives us more control. Now let
me rotate the view like this and zoom in a little bit. We’re gonna work on the
right side arm here first. And we know that sits above both of the intersections.
So let me right click on that control point there, hold Shift and right-click
on that one, then I’ll press G to move it, and then press Z to lock movement to the
Z-Axis, and I’ll move it up to about right there. I’m leaving it intersecting
a little bit, because later on we’re gonna edit the area down here to kind of
dip down underneath it, and more accommodate that sitting on top of it. So
we’re gonna leave these intersecting a little bit. Maybe that’s a little bit too
much though. Let me press G, and then Z again, move it up just a little bit more.
That looks good. Alright so that arm’s finished, and now we’ll do the same thing
with the left side arm here. So let me right click on the control point there,
I’ll zoom in and rotate the view like this, now press G to move it, then press Z
to lock it to the Z-Axis, and I’ll move it up to about right there.
However, it’s dipping down too soon here, so we have this massive intersection. So
we need to round this off more. So let me right-click on that handle on the right
side, then I’ll press G, and move it up and to the right like that, to round that
off more, and then it will just dip down more drastically over here. Alright that
looks good. And the amount of intersection looks pretty good. Alright
so far so good. Now let me pan the scene down, I’ll rotate it, and zoom into that
final intersection we need to fix. So we know this arm right here goes above the
other one at that intersection. So I’ll right-click on that control point, then
I’ll simply press G to move it, then press Z to lock it to the Z-Axis, and
I’ll move it up to about right there. Now let me rotate the view, make sure it
looks good all around, and it does. There’s maybe a little bit too much
intersecting going on in the middle. I want to create a little bit of a gap
there. So let me press numpad 7 for top view. And what we’ll do is just move this
control point to the right, and then we’ll move this one to the left.
So with this control point selected, I’ll press G, and then move it to the right
like that, and left click and drop it there, then right click on this control point,
press G, and move to the left, until you can see a hint of a gap in between them
like that down there. Now when you rotate the view you can see
there’s a little bit of space between them, and no intersecting. So we’re good
to go. All right let’s edit these ends a little
bit more as well. So let me rotate the view like this. I want this one to be
dipping down a little bit. So I’ll right-click on that handle there, then I’ll
press G, and I’ll move it like that. And I want it to overhang a little bit
more. So I’ll right-click on that control point, press G, and move it to the right a
little bit, perfect. So now also dips down right
there, where it’s going, where it’s kind of bridging the two areas. Which is more
realistic, because you know, gravity and everything. And now let’s go over to this
one. And how’s this looking? I want this to overhang maybe a little bit more, but
everything else about it is perfect. So I’ll right-click on that control point,
and angle the view like this, so it’s flat right there at the end. Then I’ll just
simply press G, and move to left a little bit. Now it moved the roundness at the
top over to the left as well. So I’ll right-click on that handle, press G, and
move it up and to the right to correct that. All right everything’s looking
pretty good. All right now we’re done with curve editing. But what I want to do
now is, if I press the Z key for wire-frame, I want to be able to edit all of this
geometry that we see, all these lines. But we can’t do that when we’re using curves,
we can only edit it by the control points. So what we’re gonna do is convert
this to a mesh, and that way all of this geometry, all of this detail becomes real
and we can edit it however we see fit. So now let me press Tab to get out of edit
mode. And to convert this, we’ll press Alt + C for the convert menu, and we’ll
convert this to a mesh from curve. So left click on that. And now if we press
Tab to go back in edit mode, you can see instead of control points and handles, we
now have all these vertices that we can select and move around to reshape things.
So now we’re gonna do some mesh editing in order to cap the ends first. So let me
zoom in to this one. And I want to select all of the vertices connected to this
loop here, this circle. So in order to loop select this I’ll hold the Alt key,
and I’ll right-click on one of the edges between the vertices. And that’s going to
select all the edges connected to it in the same direction. So with all those
vertices selected now, let me rotate the view like this, so that it’s nice and
flat on the end there. We’re gonna extrude this to the right, and then scale
it down a few times, until we have a nice rounded end. Now we’ll extrude this the
same way we did with the curves. You just simply press the E key, and it extrudes it
to new points, and connects it to the old ones. So we’ll bring this down to
about right there, and then left-click to drop it there. And let’s start, let’s
start scaling it down to round off the end. So I’ll press S. And right now you
can see it’s scaling toward our 3d cursor, all the way on the left there
still. So let me right click to cancel that. And let’s
reset the pivot point so it scales toward the middle of the selection. So
let me go back down to the pivot point menu here, and switch it back to the
default median point. Now we can press S and scale that down a little bit to
about right there, and I’ll left-click. And we’ll extrude it two more times and
keep scaling it down. So let me press E to extrude it. And I won’t extrude it as
far this time, because remember we want to round this off and end it. So I’ll left
click there, and then press S and scale that down to really start rounding this
off, and I’ll left-click right there. Let me zoom in. And let’s do that one more
time. So I’ll press E, extrude it, extrude it out even less than before, and
left-click there, then press S and scale that down like that. So that creates a
nice rounded progression to the tip for us. And now let me rotate the view. So now
we still have a hole on the end that we need to face up. Now in order to create
faces, you have to select anywhere from three or more vertices, and then press
the F key to create a face between them. Now it’s typically best to face up four
vertices to form something called a quad. So that’s what we’re gonna do here. So let
me right click on that vertex, hold Shift, and I’ll right click on those three as
well so it selects four adjacent vertices. Now we can press the F key to
create a quad face between them. Now what you can also do in situations like this,
is select just two vertices. Then if you press the F key it tries to find the
next two vertices in the sequence and create a nice clean quad for you. If it
can, sometimes it can’t do that. But in this case it’s very obvious that the
next two vertices are gonna form a quad, so we can continue pressing F all the
way down the line. All right so that faced that up. And now let me zoom out. And
let’s go over here to this one. and we’ll face this up the same way. Now in order
to select all the vertices of that circle, we’ll use loop select just like
on the other side. So let me hold Alt, and I’ll right-click on the edge right there
between the vertices, and it will select every edge connected to it. Now let me
rotate the view like this, until it’s nice and flat on the end there, and
I’ll zoom in a little bit. And what we’re going to do is extrude this three times
to the left, and scale down each time, just like we did with the other side. So
now I’ll press E to extrude it, and I’ll bring it down and to the left a little bit
like that, and then left-click to drop it there. And let’s start scaling it in. So
I’ll press S, and I’ll scale it down to about
right there, and left click. Now let’s extrud it two more times. So let’s press E,
extrude it to the left and down, but not quite as much as before, so I’ll drop it
right there. Then press S and scale that down to really start rounding this off.
And press E one more time, extrude it to the left, and down just a little bit, then press S, and
we’ll scale that down like that. Now we need to face up that circle there. So let
me zoom into it. And I’ll select the top two vertices, and just press F all
the way down the line, and we’re good to go. Cool, so let’s Tab out and take a look
at our pretzel so far. Not bad. Now let me press numpad one for front view. And what
I’m going to do is move the pretzel up on the Z-Axis in order to sit on the red
line here. Until we make a table, we’re just gonna pretend like the red line is
our table. So let me zoom in over here, and I’ll press G to move it, and then press Z
to lock it to the Z-Axis, and I’ll move it up right on top of the red line just
like that. And now what we need to do is kind of squash everything on the Z-Axis
so that it’s less round and more of an oval shape.
So let me Tab into edit mode, I’ll press A once or twice to select everything. And
our cursor should still be at the bottom of the pretzel. If it’s not, press Shift +
S, and choose cursor to center. That’ll center the cursor in the world,
which just happens to be centered over that red line, which is also our table. So
now we can scale everything down toward that cursor, and kind of squash the
roundness of the pretzel a little bit. So let me go down to the pivot point menu,
and I’ll change pivot point back to 3d cursor, then I’ll press S to scale it, and
then Z to scale on the Z-Axis. And I’ll scale it down to about 0.85, and I’m looking at
the value at the bottom-left of the 3d view,
then I’ll left-click there. And you can see we have more of an oval shape now,
instead of round. And that just looks a little bit more realistic.
All right that’s actually looking a lot better. All right now what we’re gonna do
is fix the areas of the intersections like right here. And don’t follow along
right now. I’m just gonna real quick show you what we’re gonna do, and then I’ll
take you through step by step. So what we’ll do is take these two edge loops
right there. And we’re still using the 3d cursor as the pivot point. So I’m gonna
press S, and then Z, to scale that down like that, and create a little bit of a
dip there. However, the vertices surrounding it aren’t affected by that
scaling. So we have kind of an abrupt angle change there. So what I’m gonna do
is use something called proportional vertex editing. So let me undo that and
I’ll turn on connected proportional editing. That’s going to allow us to have
a fall-off. So if I scale these down, these the vertices in the surrounding
area that are connected to it, are going to be affected as well based on a
fall-off. So now if I press S and then Z, you can see there’s a circle there, which
is our fall-off size. Any vertices within that range are affected by it as
well, but to a lesser degree as it gets toward the outside. So this is going to
allow us to have more of a rounded edge there, instead of an abrupt angle change.
All right so let me reset everything, and I’ll take you through step by step now.
So angle your view like this, and then hold Alt and right click on that edge
between the points, so it selects that entire loop of vertices, then hold Alt
and Shift, and right click on that edge, and I’ll select that loop of vertices as
well. And now we already have the 3d cursor as the pivot point, but let’s go
down into the proportional editing menu now, and choose connected. Make sure you don’t just choose enable, because then it’s going to affect the vertices on
this piece too. We want the vertices that are just in a surrounding area that are
connected to the ones we have selected. So let’s enable connected proportional
editing, and now we can start scaling this. So now let me press S to start
scaling it toward the 3d cursor, then press Z to lock it to the Z-Axis,
and then I’ll bring it right below the dough like that. And let’s adjust the fall-off
now by using the scroll wheel on the mouse. So I’ll adjust it to right there,
so we have a nice rounded top there as it goes to dip down, and then I’ll left click.
Let’s rotate around, make sure that looks good everywhere. And yep, that looks
perfect, awesome. So now we’ll do the same thing to
the other side here. And just as a quick note. If you accidentally left clicked
away and the cursor is misplaced, simply press Shift and S and choose cursor to
center to reset that. All right now on this side, it looks like there’s just one
edge loop immediately in the middle of this area. So let me hold Alt, and I’ll
right-click on that edge there, and it’ll select all the connected edges, and we’ll
just scale this one down on the Z-Axis and go from there. So let me get an
angle over here like this, so I can see right under the dough right there. And
I’ll press S to start scaling toward the cursor, then press Z to lock it to the Z-Axis, and I’ll increase, I’ll use the scroll wheel on the mouse to increase the
fall-off a little bit, and I’ll left click right there. So it’s starting
to dip down underneath. So it’s good on that side,
however, we could use more of a dip over here. So I guess I’ll take this edge loop
as well, scale that on the Z-Axis too. So let me hold Alt, right click on that edge
right there to select that whole edge loop, then I’ll press S, and then Z, and
scale that down a little bit as well. All right, we got a good dip on this side, we
got a good dip on that side, and we are good to go with them. So let’s do the
same thing for the intersection back here. Now let me Tab back into edit mode
and let’s see which edge loop we want to scale down. Let me go underneath, it looks
like this edge loop right here is right in the middle of it. So let me hold Alt
and I’ll right-click on that edge to select that whole loop. And let me rotate
the view like this, and let’s get a view of it over here. So now I’ll press S to scale
it, and then press Z to lock it on the Z-Axis, I’ll scale it down like that, and
let me scroll down on the mouse wheel until it increases the fall-off a little
bit, I’ll scale it down to about right there, and then left-click. So that looks
good underneath, we might need to scale it down a little bit more on the outside.
And in there is looking pretty good, but that could scale down a little bit more
as well. So let me hold Alt, and right click on that edge there to select that
loop, and let’s scale this down a little bit as well. So I’ll press S, and then Z,
scale it down just a touch, to help it out over there on the inside. That looks
good. Let’s do the same on the outside here. Let me hold Alt, and I’ll
right-click on this edge loop, then I’ll press S then Z, scale that down a little
bit, and let’s increase the, or let’s decrease the fall-off, just to round off
that top there, and I’ll left-click there. Alright that looks good.
And now we just gotta deal with the center. All right let me Tab back into
edit mode, and then I’ll swing around to the bottom like this. Let’s see which of
these edge loops is in the middle of this intersection. So it looks like these
three right here. So let me hold Alt, and I’ll right-click on that edge there to
select that whole loop, then hold Alt and Shift, and right click on both of those
edge loops as well. And now let me rotate the view, swing around to the top, and get
a good view of this intersection right here. Actually, yeah let’s look at this
one. And I’ll press the S key to scale it down
toward the cursor, then press Z to lock it to the Z-Axis, then scroll down on the
mouse wheel until it increases the fall-off like that,
and I’ll scale down to about right there. So it’s got a nice dip right there, and
then it looks good on the other side as well,
so I think we’re good to go. Maybe I could scale it down a little bit more right
here. So let me hold Alt, and I’ll right-click on that edge there, then
press S, and then Z, scale it down just a little bit, and increase the fall-off ,and
left-click there. So that looks a lot smoother there. And cool everything’s
kind of interlocking very nicely now. Now before calling this complete. I want
to add some variation to the diameter throughout the pretzel, because right now
it’s completely consistent in how thick it is all the way around. So to add more
realism, we’re gonna add that extra detail in. So let me Tab back into edit
mode, and let’s reset the pivot point back to median. So let me go down to the
pivot point menu and switch that back to median point. Now I’m gonna make areas like
right here a little bit skinnier so it gets more bulbous on the end. So let me
hold Alt, and I’ll right-click on that edge there to select that loop, then I’ll
press S to scale it down. And let’s use the scroll wheel to increase the
fall-off so it has more of a, so it has more of a smooth transition, I’ll scale
it down to about right there, and then left click. Now let’s do the same thing
over here. Let me hold Alt, and right click on that edge there, then press S, and
scale that down to make it skinnier, and then left click. Now I’m gonna make areas
like the top two corners a little bit fatter, as well as the bottom. So let me
hold Alt, and I’ll right-click on that edge there, then press S and scale it up
a bit. And we’ll do the same thing for the top corners. So that just additional
size variation just adds to the realism by being an extra detail so things don’t
look completely consistent. Alright let’s take one quick look around
our object, make sure everything looks good before we move on. I think my
pretzel might dip down a little bit too much there, so let me fix that real quick.
Let me switch the pivot point back to 3d cursor,
and I’ll Tab back in, and I’ll hold Alt and right click on that edge there, then
I’ll press S, and then Z, and scale it up, and I’ll just scroll up on the mouse
wheel to decrease the fall off, and I’ll scale it up to right there. That creates a
better connection right there. And all right, that looks perfect,
cool. So let me press numpad 7 for top view, and there’s our finished pretzel.
Now let’s go back down to the header and into the pivot point menu, and we’ll
reset the pivot point back to median point. Now what I want to do is set up
the view for the final render. So we’re gonna have to add a new camera in since
we deleted our original one. So let me press Shift and A and I’ll add in a
camera. Then I’ll press the Z key for wire-frame view. And you can see our
camera in the middle of everything. So let me press numpad 3 for side view, I’ll
zoom out a bit, I’ll press G, and I’ll move it up and to the left like that, and
left-click right about there. And now I’ll press R to rotate it, and point it
at the pretzel as best as you can, and I’ll left click right there. Now to go
into camera view we press numpad 0. And it looks like my pretzel is pretty much
centered perfectly, but if you want to center it more, you can simply press the
G key, and then just move it wherever you need to.
I’ll left click right there, and then I’ll press Z for shaded view, so we can
actually see the pretzel. Now I want more of an angled shot. So what I want to do
is rotate around the middle of the pretzel. And right now the cursor is
still in the middle of the world, so let’s rotate around that. So let me go
back into the pivot point menu and switch that to 3d cursor. Now I can press
R to rotate around the cursor, then press Z to rotate around the vertical Z-Axis,
and I’ll swing this over to right here to get a nice angled shot of the pretzel.
Alright that looks pretty good. Now let me center this a little bit
better. So I’ll press G, I’ll move it to the right and up a little bit like that.
And if you want to zoom in or out, you can also press G, and then middle click
as you’re moving, and it’ll zoom in and out for you. So I’ll zoom in to about
right there and left click, and then press G, and just center the view a
little bit better, like that. Alright cool, perfect. Now let’s add in a
table for the pretzel. Now the table is just going to be a plane since we’re not
going to see the edges of it. So let’s press numpad 7 for top view. And make
sure the cursor is in the middle of the world. If it’s not press Shift + S and
choose cursor to center. Let me zoom out a bit, and I’ll press Shift + A, and I’ll
add in a mesh plane. Now let me Tab into edit mode, and I’ll
press the Z key for wire-frame so we can see it. And all the vertices should be
selected. So now I’ll just press S and I’ll scale that up like that. And let me
press numpad 0 for camera view, just make sure it encompasses the entire camera
view like this. If it doesn’t just simply press S and scale it up a little bit
larger. But it looks like I scaled it up perfectly. And right now you can see we
still have a fall-off in the middle. So we have proportional editing still
enabled. Let’s disable that now, because I don’t think we’re gonna be using it anymore. So
let me go into the proportional editing menu and just click on disable. All right let
me Tab out of edit mode, I’ll press Z for shaded view, and here’s what we got so
far. Now let me press Shift and Space to get out fullscreen, and I’ll press numpad
7 for top view. Let me zoom into the pretzel and I’ll right-click on it to
select it. And right now if I Tab into edit mode, you can see all of our faces are
rather large, this is kind of a low resolution pretzel. So what I want to do
is add more geometry to this, which is going to help us better define where
salt goes on the surface. And also later on in the next chapter of the series,
it’s gonna help us actually color the pretzel in. So let me go over to the
modifier buttons here, and click on add modifier, and add in a subdivision
surface modifier. And you’ll notice that things are a lot smoother now. You can
see the low-resolution cage we have, and then the subsurf modifier takes the
shape of the cage, and it basically just smooths it out on the inside of it. So we
have a much smoother, more high-resolution pretzel now. In fact, if
you press the Z key for wire-frame and then Tab out of edit mode, you can see how
much extra geometry we have. And right now we can’t actually use that extra
geometry, because it’s only being generated by the subsurf modifier, it’s
not actually real. And that’s actually a great thing about the modifiers. You can
work from a lower resolution model and still have a high resolution final
product. And that just makes things a whole lot easier to edit when you don’t
have that many vertices to work with. Now it’s typically not a good idea to apply
your modifiers, because then it actually takes all of this extra detail and it
makes it real. So it modifies your original mesh, which is going to make
things a little bit harder to edit if you need further editing. In
this case I want to apply one subdivision level. Just for the extra
geometry too, like I said, add salt to the surface, and also it helps us with the
coloring of the pretzel later on. So let’s make sure that your pretzel is
exactly the way you want it to look before you apply the modifier. And once
it is, make sure that you’re in object mode, because you can’t apply a modifier while
you’re in edit mode. And then let’s go over to the modifier, make sure you set
the view subdivision level to 1, if it isn’t already, and then click on apply. It
will apply it at the view subdivision level. And now if we Tab into edit mode, you
can see we have all these extra vertices to work with. And now what we’re gonna do
is select all the areas that we want to have salt. So let’s make sure we’re in
shaded view by pressing Z once or twice. And let’s make sure this option in the
header is enabled. It’s called limit selection to visible. When it’s disabled,
you have basically x-ray vision. So if we select anything on the surface, it’ll
also select all the way through. So make sure this option is enabled. So when we
make a selection it’s only going to select vertices that are visible. So now
let’s press the C key for circle select. And you can use the scroll wheel on the
mouse to make the circle bigger or smaller. I’m gonna make it just a little
bit smaller than the width of the pretzel. And what I’m gonna do now is
just left-click and drag to select all the vertices in the areas I want there
to be salt. So I’ll start here, I’ll just left-click, and just drag and
sweep along the surface all the way around. So let me right click to get out of
select mode. And the idea here is that salt will be randomly distributed
within all the regions that we have selected. So let me go over to the object
data buttons, and under the vertex groups panel, click on the plus sign to add a
new vertex group, and double-click on the name, and we’ll rename this to salt
surface, and then click on assign. So all of our selected vertices are now in the
salt surface vertex group. And we’ll be able to use this information later on
when we actually go to distribute the salt particles. Now if you rotate the
view, you’ll notice that because of the limit selection to visible option being
turned on, it didn’t select any vertices on the side or on the bottom. Where
salt would just fall off anyway. So it only selected vertices that were visible
on the top. And you can go ahead and refine your selection if you want to. For
example, I’d like these two vertices to be part of the group. So I’ll just press
C, and left-click and drag over any extra vertices I’d want to be part of that
salt group. And once you’re done refining your selection…just go back over to salt
surface and make sure you click on assign to add those new vertices to that
group. All right let me press numpad 7 to go back in the top view. And once you’re
done refining your selection we can move on. Now let’s actually create a salt
object that will randomly distribute over the entire salt surface. So let me
press Tab to get out of edit mode. And let’s go down to the layers down here,
and I’ll click on the second block for the second layer. And now let’s press Shift + A and add in a mesh cube. Let’s press the N key now for the right side
toolbar. And let’s change the name of this by going to the item panel here, and
renaming this to salt cube. Then I’ll press N to get rid of that. And let’s go
back to the first layer now. We’re done with this for now. So I’ll click on the
first block there to go back to the layer with our pretzel. And let’s add in
a particle system that we’ll use to distribute that, that salt cube object
all over our salt surface. Now let’s right click on our pretzel to select it,
and let’s go over to the particle settings by clicking on that icon there.
Now click on new to create a new particle system, and under the settings
field right here let’s rename this to salt. We’re going to be reusing these
settings for other particle systems as well, so I want to name that something
that’s going to be easily recognized. So right now it’s set to emitter and let’s
see what that looks like. Let me rotate the view, and I’ll press the Z key for
wire-frame, and I’ll press Alt +A to start playing
an animation. You can see that when it’s set to emitter, it’s actually emitting
these dynamic particles that are affected by things like gravity. So we
don’t want that, we want static particles. So in order to get static particles we
change the type from emitter to hair. And at the moment it gives us these, and well it
gives us a hairy pretzel. Which might be a cool look in the end, but what we’re
gonna do is switch all these hairs over to our salt cube. So we’ll have salt
randomly distributed on the surface, instead of gross hairy pretzel that fell
on the floor. So let’s go over here, and we’re gonna switch this from path, which
is what these strands are, over to object. That way we can actually use a real
object in place of those strands. So let me click on the dupli object field below that, and we’ll load in salt cube. So now you can see the cube that we made is all over the surface, but it’s not
being confined to any particular area, and we want to confine this to the salt
surface vertex group. So let me go down to the vertex groups panel right here,
and I’ll expand that, and now then under the density field, I’ll click on that and
choose salt surface. Now you can see our cubes are only being placed on the areas
where we selected those vertices and added them to that vertex group. All
right so far so good. Now obviously we still have a little work to do. These are
way too big, there’s too many of them, and they’re too uniform. So let’s fix the
scale first. Let’s go over to the size field here underneath the dupli object
group, and we’ll change the size down to 0.007. I’m going to increase random
size up to 0.25 as well. That’s just gonna give us a little variation in the
scale of these cubes. All right that’s looking good so far.
All right let’s change the number of particles down now. Let’s go over to the
number field here, and we’ll decrease that down to 600 particles. And that
looks a lot better. And now let’s deal with the uniformity by randomizing the
rotation of the salt particles. So let’s go over here, and we’re gonna need to
enable an advanced set of options in order to get the rotation values we need.
So let’s click on advanced to enable that. Now we have this new rotation panel
here. So let me expand that, and I’ll click on the check box to enable it, and
let’s change the initial orientation to normal. What that’s going to do is it’s
going to take the surface that the salt cube is on, and it’s going to rotate the
cube based on that surface. So now we can actually increase the random value
here up to 1, and it will totally randomize the rotation of the cube.
Alright so that is looking good, that’s shaping up. Now it was actually important
to switch the initial orientation to normal. If we left it at velocity and
hair, the random value just doesn’t work. So we need to give these cubes an
initial orientation based on the angle of the surface, and then it can randomize
the angle of the cubes. Now if you don’t quite grasp that idea, it doesn’t really
matter, you just need to remember that that is how you randomize the rotation.
So now what we’re gonna do is make these cubes look a little bit less cube like
and more salt like. So let me click on the second layer down there, and I’ll
right click on the cube to select it, and let’s do some editing. Now I’ll press Tab
to go into edit mode, and we need some more vertices to work with, so we’re
gonna subdivide this. But I’m also going to use a tool called subdivide fractal
to give us a random look in the end. So it’s gonna make something that looks a
little bit more jagged, a little bit more crystal like. So let me press the T key
for the left side toolbar. We’re gonna need this operator menu down here. So let me click on that border and drag it to the right, I’ll click on this border and drag
it up. So whenever we use a tool, we typically have some options that pop up
in this operator panel. So I’ll press W over here, and then click on a subdivide from the specials menu. And it gives us these extra vertices to work
with by basically taking each quad, putting a vertex in the middle, in order
to have four quads instead of one. So we’ve got all these extra vertices to
work with, and over here we have some subdivide options. Namely we have this
fractal option here. If I left click on that and increase it, you can see it
randomizes the positions of all the vertices. So I’m gonna increase that to
something like 2.38 looks pretty good. And you can even use
the random seed value down here, to create a randomized look. So maybe I’ll
go with, that looks pretty good, I’ll go with random seed of 6. And it gives me
more of a jagged look for our cube. And you can edit that a little bit more if
you want. Just by selecting some vertices and pressing G to move them around. I’m
just gonna stick with that, it looks good enough to me. So let me press the T key to
get rid of that toolbar, I’ll press Tab to get out of edit mode, and then I’ll
click on the first layer to go back to our pretzel. Now before I go ahead and
add mustard to this, what I’m gonna do is make sure that this is as high
resolution as we need it to be for the final render. Because for example, if i
zoom in, you can see the silhouette of this is kind of faceted, which indicates
that it’s low resolution and we could make this a little bit more detailed. So
let me go over, well first let me right click on the pretzel to select it. Then
let’s go over to the modifier buttons and add in a subdivision surface
modifier. That’s gonna smooth things out just like we did earlier on. And right
now it’s set to a view level of 1. Which is giving us this much detail, which is
probably all we need for the final render as well. So make sure you set the
render level down to 1 as well. All right so everything is looking a lot more
smooth now, and that should give us a better final render. Now there’s one last
little thing I want to do with that, and that’s move the subsurf modifier to the
top of the modifier stack so that it’s calculated first. The reason that’s
important is because we want the particle system to be based on the final
subsurfed mesh, so that the salt particles placement is more accurate. So let me
click on the up arrow of the subsurf modifier, and keep your eyes on salt
cubes, you’ll notice they change position a little bit. And that’s more accurate
now. Because with the particle system at the top of the stack, it was just being
calculated based on the low resolution mesh, so it wasn’t quite as accurate.
Alright now what I want to do is fix these little dimples on the end here,
they’ve been bugging me. So let me Tab into edit mode. And you can see this weird
arrangement of vertices in the middle, and that’s what’s creating our dimples.
So what we’re gonna do is delete those vertices and just reface the area. So let
me press A to deselect everything, and then I’ll press the C key for circle
select, and then I’ll left click and drag over all those vertices in the middle,
and then right click to get out of it, then I’ll press X and erase those
vertices. Now let’s select that inner circle by
holding Alt and right clicking on one of its edges, until the whole loop is
selected. Now let’s rotate the view until it’s nice and flat on the end like that, like
we’ve done before, and I’ll zoom in. And I want to scale this down to make it more
rounded there, but before I do that, we need to reset the pivot point. So let me
go into the pivot point menu and change it back to median point. Now press S and
scale that down quite a bit like that to round it off more, and I’ll left click right
there. And let’s make one more extrusion and scale it down. So I’ll press E,
extrude it to the right just a little bit like that, and drop it there, then press S and
scale that down to about right there. Now we just have a small hole to fill in. So
what I’ll do is press F to create what’s called an n-gon. And what an n-gon is
is any face that has more than four vertices. And you typically shouldn’t use
n-gon’s, because it can create some weird shading. But in this case it’s a very
small area, and it’s a fairly flat area, so I don’t think it’s gonna cause any
trouble. But just to make sure, let’s Tab out of edit mode, and we’ll rotate the
view to make sure all the shading looks good in the area. And it does. All right
so that solved that problem. And the other problem, I mean the other piece
over here, has the same issue. And you can go ahead and fix that if you want, but
it’s not gonna be visible for my final render, since we’re we have a view over
here of this. So I’m just gonna ignore the other side for now and move on.
All right let’s create some mustard. So let me press numpad 7 for top view. And let me get rid of the plane in the background. It’s not only too bright, but it’s also
getting in my way when I rotate the scene. So let me right click on it to
select it, and then press H to hide it. Now let me right click on the pretzel. Let’s
hide the particle system for right now, because I want to draw a path for the
mustard directly on the surface of the pretzel, so I don’t want the salt getting
in the way. So let me go over to the particle system modifier, and just click
on the eye to make it invisible in the viewport. Now we’re gonna use a mesh to
draw the path for the mustard. It’s just a little bit easier than using curves,
because this is going to be more of a detailed path, and I don’t want to have
to deal with all of the handles and control points. So with the cursor still
in the middle of the world, I’ll press Shift and A, and I’ll add in a mesh plane.
And let me press the Z key for wire-frame view, and
I’ll Tab into edit mode. And we only need two of these vertices. So let me select,
I’ll right-click on that to select it, hold Shift, and right click on that, then
press X, and erase both of those vertices. Now let me press A to select all these
vertices, and I’ll move them into the middle of the gap right there, and then
left click. Now I’ll press the Z key for shaded view again. It’s important that we be
in this view, because we’re gonna need to be able to see these surfaces, in order
to snap these vertices directly on to those surfaces. Now let’s enable some
snapping tools to help us with this. So let’s go to the header down here, and
first will enable the magnet icon there for automatic snapping. Then let’s go
into the snap element menu here and change it over to face. That’s going to
make it so whenever we move a vertex, if there’s a face behind, it it’s gonna snap
directly to it. So let me right click on that vertex there, I’ll press G and move
it down and to the right like this, where we want the mustard to start, and then I’ll
left click. Now if you rotate the view you can see that that vertex is directly
on top of that surface, so our snapping tools are indeed working. Let me press
numpad 7 for top view again, and I’ll right click on the other vertex now to select that, then press G, and move it onto the surface
right here, and then left-click. And now what we’re going to do, is basically extrude
this vertex all the way around to form the path of our mustard. And you can get
a little bit fancy with this if you want to too. You can create some swirls, you
can create some zigzags. I’m going to create basically a straight path first,
and then I’ll go through and maybe add some extra vertices to edit it and make
it look a little bit more interesting. So now let me press E, and I’ll extrude it to
right there, and I’ll just keep doing that all the way down the line. And when we come to intersections like this, here’s what we’re gonna do. We’re gonna press E and
extrude it right to the base of that intersection there, and then we’re gonna
extrude it three times on top. Or actually, let’s extrude it four times on
top. So I’ll press E, extrude it to the side right there, then press E and extrude
it two times on the top, and then one on this side, and then press E and extrude
it to the base over there. So let me rotate the view, and I’ll show you why. If
the vertices at the base are too far away, we have some basically floating
mustard. So we didn’t want that, so we have to have them pretty close to those
intersections. Though I did leave a little bit of space, because I think
that’s more realistic, the mustard will be hanging there a little tiny bit. So
that looks good to me. Let me press numpad 7 to go back into top view, and let’s
continue our extrusions all the way around. So I’ll just keep pressing E, and
extrude it right in the middle of the pretzel like this, and let’s get one at
the base right there. And again, we’ll extrude it four times on
top. So let’s get one on the side, two up top, and one on this side, and then one at
the base. And we’ll just keep extruding around. Same thing over here. One at the
base, four on the part that goes up, and then one on the other side. And another
way to extrude it around. You don’t have to keep pressing E. You can also hold
Ctrl and left click and it will make an extrusion to that point. So I’ll keep
doing that from now on. All right so we made it to the end. I’ll place my last
point there. And that’s what we’ve got so far. Right now the path of the mustard is
too perfect. It’s dead center of the pretzel, and there’s no variation. So
that’s not going to be as fun or as realistic in the end. So what we’re gonna
do now is just go through, add some extra vertices, and move some vertices around
to create some variations. So let me start up here, I’ll select these two
vertices, press W and subdivide them. Now I can select that vertex, press G, and
move it around like that. To create more of a zigzag there. I’ll
select that, press G, and move it up. And that’s all I’m gonna do. I’m going to
subdivide some vertices, or subdivide some edges I mean, and then just move
some vertices around to create a more interesting look. All right so this is my end result right
here. And once you’re finished editing yours, we can move on. Now let’s reset the
snapping tools before we do anything else. So I’m gonna go down to the header,
switch the snap element back to increment, so we can snap things to
blenders grid again, and then click on the magnet icon to turn that off. So now
we can enable snapping by holding Ctrl, instead of it being automatic. All right
now let’s add a subsurf modifier to smooth out these lines. So let me Tab out
of edit mode, I’ll press the Z key for wire-frame, so we can actually see the
lines, and let’s go over to the modifiers and add in a subdivision surface. That’s
gonna smooth out our zigzags and stuff like that, just make it look more liquid
like I guess. And let’s increase the view level to 2, so it’s nice and smooth all
the way around. Alright that’s looking good so far. Now we’re gonna do something similar to what we did with the pretzel curve. Where we added a bevel shape to it
so it was actually 3d. But that only works with curved objects, not mesh
objects, which is what this is. So what we’re going to do is just convert this
to a curved object, and then we’ll go from there. So to convert this, the hotkey
for that again is Alt + C. And we’re gonna convert it to a curve from a mesh
this time. So left-click on that. Now if we Tab in edit mode you can see that
it’s a little bit different, and we have those path lines which indicates that
this is indeed a curve. And now we can use all the curve options, like bevel
depth, which is going to make this 3d for us.
Let me Tab out of edit mode now, and let’s go up to the object data buttons by clicking on that icon there, which is going to give us our curve options. Now
instead of simply using the bevel depth option here, which is going to extrude a
perfect circle along that path, we’re going to use the option below that
called bevel object. This enables us to create our own curve shape and have that
extrude along the path instead of a perfect circle. Which is better, because
I’d rather have more of an oval shape extruding along that path instead of a
perfect circle. And this only works with curve objects. So let me press Shift and
A, and from the curves sub-menu I’ll add in a circle. And let me pan over here. I’m
gonna bring it over here, away from everything else, so we can edit it. I’ll
press G, and then X, and I’ll left click over there to drop it, now let me press
Tab to go into edit mode, and I’ll press S, and then Y, and I’ll scale that down to
more of an oval shape like that, and then left click. And let me Tab out of edit
mode. And let’s rename this actually. So I’ll press the N key. Actually, probably
not necessary, but we’ll rename it anyway. So in the item panel right here,
we’ll rename this to mustard shape, then I’ll press N to get rid of that toolbar.
Let me select our mustard path here now, and over in the bevel object field here,
I’ll left click on that, and select our mustard shape. So you can see the mustard shape is actually extruding through, but it’s really huge. So it takes into
account how big it is out here. So let me right click on that to select it, Tab into edit
mode, press S to scale down, until we get the right diameter of mustard like that,
and left click. How’s that looking? That looks a lot better. All right we’re off
to a good start with that now. Now let me select the mustard object, so I’ll
right-click on that, and it’s intersecting the pretzel a little bit
too much. So let me zoom in, and I’ll press G, and then Z, to move it up on the Z-Axis.
Let’s leave it intersecting a little bit, so it’s kind of like flat on the bottom,
but I just wanted more of a rounded edge there like that. And that looks good. And
now we’re going to need to edit this pretty much the same way we did with the
pretzel. We have the mustard intersecting right there, so we’re gonna have to bump
one up and over the other. And also, when we’re finished with that. We’ll also make
some areas thinner, and some areas a little bit fatter. Just like we did with
the pretzel as well. Now the first thing I’ll do is smooth out this faceted look.
So let me press the T key for left side toolbar, and with this object selected in
object mode, we can then go up to the tools option here, and click on smooth
shading. Let’s press T to get rid of that, and let me Tab into edit mode. What we’re
going to do now is use connected proportional editing to bump up these,
these ropes of mustard over one another. So let me go down to the proportional
editing menu here and enable connected. Now what we’re going to do is just
follow a logical path, and see which ropes of mustard go over the other. So we
started the mustard over here, which means this stays on the bottom. So both
of these, in this direction, will bump up and over it. So let me right click on
that vertex right there, I’ll press G, and then Z, and move it straight up, and then
use the scroll wheel on the mouse to just effect a little bit, just affect a
few vertices around it like that, and I’ll left-click right there. That looks
good to me. And we’ll do the same thing down here. Let me right click on that
vertex, press G, and then Z, and move it up,
just like that. And what we can do is fix some of the intersections like over here.
So let me right click on that vertex, press G, I’ll scroll on the mouse
wheel to increase the fall-off and bring it over like that. I’ll do the same thing
over here. And that’s basically what I’m going to do. I’m going to go around the
whole mesh. I’m going to fix the intersections, or areas that are
intersecting too much like right here. And I’m gonna also make some of these
ropes of mustard bump up and over the others. Now once you’re finished editing that,
what we’re gonna do is convert this to a mesh object, in order to cap the ends and
also make some areas thinner. So let me Tab out of edit mode. And if you press Z to
go in the wire-frame, you can see it’s pretty high resolution right now. So I
want to lower the resolution or in order to make this a little bit easier to edit
when we convert it to a mesh. So right now the resolution is a little bit too
high, because our curved object over here has a resolution that’s too high. So let
me right click on that to select it, and I’ll go up to the preview U resolution
right here, and I’ll just click on the left arrow and decrease that down to,
let’s go with 4. So you can see the resolution is a lot lower now, and a lot
more manageable, so it’s going to be easier to edit. All right and looks good.
So let me right click on that, make sure it’s selected. And I’ll press Alt + C and
convert it to a mesh from a curve. Now if we press Tab to go into edit mode, you
can see we have good old-fashioned mesh vertices to work with. So now we can start
editing this the same way we did with the pretzel. We’re gonna cap the ends, and
then we’re just gonna make some areas thinner, just for some extra variation to
make things look more realistic. So let me zoom in to this over here. We’ll start
off with this. And let me hold Alt and right click on that edge there to select
that loop of vertices. And I still have proportional editing on, which is good,
because we want this to kind of taper off to a point instead of just have a
rounded end. So I’ll press S to scale that down like that. And you can see the
kind of tapering effect is having. So I’ll scale it down to right there,
then press left click to confirm that. And now let’s turn off proportional
editing and we’re gonna round off the end. So let me go down into the menu
here, and I’ll disable proportional editing, and let me angle the view like
this, so that it’s nice and flat on the end, then I’ll press S to scale that down
to about right there, and then press G, and move it over here. And now let’s
extrude that and scale it down again. So I’ll press E to extrude it, and I’ll
left-click to drop it there, and press S to scale down. And I think that’s looking
pretty good. Let me press G and move it inward a little bit, just to round it off instead of having it more pointy. And I’ll just press F and
create an n-gon there. Let me Tab out, make sure everything
looks good. Alright that looks pretty cool. Now let’s go over to this side and
we’ll do the same exact thing. So let me turn on proportional editing. So let me
press Tab to go back into edit mode, and I’ll go into the proportional
editing menu and enable connected. Now let’s hold Alt and right click on that
edge loop, I’ll press S and scale it down to taper it, and then left click there.
Now let’s go back into that menu and disable proportional editing. Then I’ll
press S to scale this down, left click there, and press G, and move to left a little
bit. Now let’s press E and extrude to the left just a touch, and then press S to
scale it down, and then finally press F to create an n-gon there. All right
let me Tab out, and zoom out. And let me see how it looks so far. All right that ain’t bad, that ain’t bad. And now let’s add some variation to the thickness here and
there. So let me tab back in, and let me go down into the proportional editing
menu and enable connected again. Now I’ll just hold Alt, and right click on that
edge there to select that circle, I’ll press S to scale down, and then I’ll
scroll on the mouse wheel to increase the fall off, and I’ll scale it down to
about right there, just to make it thinner in that area, and add some
variation to it like that. I’ll do the same thing over here. I’ll hold Alt, right
click on that edge, press S and scale it in a little bit like that. And I’ll just do
that in a couple of places, just to create some variation. All right that looks good to me. And I
actually need to fix something real quick.
Because I have the mustard going along here, and then it’s all of a sudden going
over there. When that’s not realistic, it should be flat right there, since this is
the start of our mustard path. So let me hold Alt and right click on that
edge loop, I’ll press G, and then Z, move it down. And I’ll use the scroll wheel
for the fall-off to get it right on the surface of the pretzel like that, then
I’ll select that edge loop, press G, and then Z, and move it up and over it like
that. Alright so that was quick fix on that.
Alright so edit your mustard until it looks exactly how you want it to look,
and then we’re done with it. And at the moment, it’s looking pretty jagged, so
let’s add a subsurf modifier to really smooth this out. So let’s go up and over
to the wrench icon for the modifier buttons, and add in a subdivision surface
modifier. And right now the view-port is set to level 1, and it’s still looking
slightly jagged. But we have a render level set to 2, which is gonna be perfect
in the end. And in fact, let’s do that for the pretzel as well. Let me right-click
on the pretzel to select it, and I’ll increase the render levels up to 2, just
so it’s really high resolution when we go to render it. And right now we
can re-enable the particle system visibility, and kind of see how
everything looks all together. And that’s looking pretty darn cool. Alright now let
me press numpad 7 for top view, and we’re gonna add a plate for the pretzel to sit
on. Actually first let’s get rid of the oval over here. We’re actually
finished with this. So I’ll right-click on it, and then press X and delete it. Now
make sure your cursor is centered. If it’s not press Shift + S and choose
cursor to center. Now press Shift and A and add in a mesh circle. And I’ll press
the Z key for wire-frame view to see the circle. And I’ll Tab into edit mode, and
with all the vertices selected, I’ll press S and scale it up like that, so
that it’s just about the same size as the pretzel, and then I’ll left click there.
And let me press G, and I’ll move it up a little bit, to kind of center it with the
pretzel, a little bit better like that. And let me rotate the view, let me make
sure that circle actually encompasses the whole pretzel. So it looks like I
should scale it up just a little bit. So I’ll press S and scale it up a little.
All right that looks good. And let me turn, turn off proportional editing, since
we’re done with that. So I’ll go into this menu and click on disable. And let
me press numpad 7 or top view again. And now we’re going to extrude this and
scale it up to form the part of the plate that actually rises
is up a little bit. So let’s press E to extrude it, and then immediately press S
to scale it up. And we’ll scale it up to be, about that size right there looks
pretty good, and then left-click. And now let’s rise this up. So let’s press numpad
1 for front view, and I’ll press G, and then Z, to move it straight up, and move it up to
about right there looks pretty good to me.
Let me rotate the view, and I’ll press the Z key for shaded view. And yeah
that looks good. So now let’s get to work facing up the center of this. So now I’ll
hold Alt, and right-click on one of those edges on the inside to select the inside
circle. And then for right now I’ll just simply press F to create n-gon there. Now
I want to work with this alone, away from everything else. Right now we’re in
something called global view, which is showing us everything. But if we press
forward slash on the numpad, it takes us into local view. So it’ll bring anything
you have selected into its own isolated view, so we can work with it alone, away
from everything else. Now let me Tab out of edit mode, and
let’s take a look at this. So what I want to do now is bevel the edge at the
bottom here, so it’s nice and smooth. So let’s go over to the modifiers, click add
modifier, and add in a bevel. So right now it’s beveling not only the bottom edges,
but every single edge in the mesh. So we want to constrain that to just the angle
at the bottom. So let me click on angle as the limit method. Now the angle right
here, anything above that angle will be beveled, and anything below it will not
be beveled. So let’s left-click on that, and drag it down until it’s just getting
the bottom angle like that. So I set mine to 14 degrees. And right now it’s only
beveling with one segment. So let’s increase that to get a higher resolution
bevel. So I’ll increase the segment number up to, let’s go with 4. So that’s a
nice smooth bevel there now. Let me press Z for shaded view again, and I’ll press
the T key and choose smooth shading for this. Alright that’s a good-looking bevel
at the bottom there. Let me get rid of this grid that’s intersecting it, that is
really annoying, because it always kind of looks like edges that are part of the
mesh. So let me press the N key for the right side toolbar, and where is it, let’s
expand the display panel right here, and I’ll disable grid X & Y. And that’ll
disable visibility of those things when you rotate the view, so we’re not seeing
that anymore. Now I’ll press the N key to get rid of that. And let’s
look at what we got so far. Alright that’s looking pretty good. So now let’s
add some thickness to this, and we’re gonna do that using another modifier
called solidify. So let me angle the view like this, to get a good idea of how
thick the rim is gonna be. And let’s click add modifier and add in solidify.
It added a little bit of thickness, but obviously we need to crank that up. So
let’s click on the thickness field, and drag it to the right, until we have the
right thickness. So I’m going to go with something around 0.12 looks pretty good
to me. But now we need to round it off. So let’s add in a subdivision surface
modifier, to really make this high-resolution and nicely rounded. So
let’s go back up and click on add modifier and add in a subdivision
surface. And let me increase the view levels to two, same as the render. And
it’s looking nice and smooth now. However, it really sharpened up the top here. And
the way to fix that is. Let’s tab into edit mode, and we need to add an extra
set of edges around the rim right there. The more geometry you have near a rim,
the more defined that rim is going to be when you’re using a subsurf modifier.
And that’s a general rule of the subsurf modifier too, you’ll be using that
rule all the time. So in order to add an extra set of edges
up there, we’re gonna use the loop cut tool. The hotkey for that is Ctrl + R. So
press that, and hover over the middle of the plate like that. And you can see this
purple line pops up. That’s the preview of the new edge loop that’s about to be
added in. So let’s left-click to add that edge loop in, and now we can slide it up
and down. So let’s slide it up toward that rim. And you can see the closer we get to
the top, the more defined that rim is. So let me drag it down to, right about there
looks good, and I’ll left-click. So with that extra set of edges up near the rim, we
have a more defined rim, and it’s nicely rounded off still, and everything looks
perfect. So let me Tab out and take a look at our finished plate. Not bad at
all. Now let’s go back to global view and check out our pretzel on top of the
plate. So I’ll press forward slash on the numpad to switch from local view back to
global view. And check it out, cool. Let me press numpad zero to go into camera view
and see how it looks from here. Alright we’re doing pretty good. And now what I
want to do is add some fallen salt on the plate, and the tablecloth as well,
which we still have hidden. So with the plate selected, I’ll press Tab to go
into edit mode, and I want to select the middle face. So
I’ll hold Alt, and right-click on that edge there to select that edge loop. And
what we’re going to do is just separate this into its own object, and then add a
particle system to it. So I’ll press Shift + D to duplicate it, and then right
click to keep that duplicate in place, and then I’ll press the P key and separate that
selection. And that’ll separate that into its own object. So in order to access
that object, let’s press Tab to get out of edit mode of the plate, then I’ll
press the Z key to go into wire-frame so we can actually see what we’re selecting. And I’ll right-click in that area until we select that new disc that we just
separated. And right now it’s being solidified. So I’ll click on X to delete
the solidify modifier. And we don’t need the bevel modifier either, so I’ll click
on the X for that as well. But we’ll keep subsurf so it keeps it nice and smooth
around the edges. All right so this is the area that the salt is going to be
distributed on. And you know what, let’s delete the subsurf modifier as well, we
don’t need those extra faces. So let me click on the X button for that to delete
it. And now let’s go over to the particle buttons by clicking on that icon there.
And let’s click on new to create a new particle system. And we already have salt
particle settings saved from the pretzel. So what we’ll do is go into the settings
menu right here and load in salt. And you can see we have some salt on the bottom
of the plate now. But we have I think too many salt particles in the bottom of
plate. So I want to change those settings. But the problem is, you can see there is
a number two next to the salt settings right there, and that’s the number of
objects that are using these settings. Which means if we change the settings,
like the number of particles, it’s also going to change it for the pretzel as
well. So let’s instead click on the plus sign right there, next to the name. And
that’ll create a duplicate of those settings that we can use for just the
plate. And now we can decrease the number down to maybe 300 looks good. I think
I’ll go with 300, that looks pretty good. Maybe just a touch lower. How about 250.
All right cool. Now I don’t actually want this extra disc to render, I just want
the salt particles that emits to render. So what I’ll do is go over to the
options here, and I’ll scroll down to the render panel. There’s an option called
emitter, and right now it’s enabled. That means that both the salt particles, and
the object emitting the particles will render. So I’ll just uncheck that, and
that way only the salt particles render, but the actual emitter object will be
invisible. All right so now the last thing we need
to do is just scatter some salt on the tablecloth. And right now we have that
hidden. So I’ll press Alt + H to unhide it, and I’ll right-click on it to select
it. And the first thing we’ll do is make sure that it’s underneath the plate. So
I’ll press numpad 1 for front view, and I’ll zoom in, then I’ll press G, and then
Z, to move it down on the Z-Axis, right below the plate like that, and then let
click. Alright now let me press numpad 0 for camera view.
It’s important to go into camera view, because I want make sure I have a nice scattering
of particles in the actual final render. And now let’s go over to the particle
systems, I’ll scroll up to the top, and then click on new to create a new system.
Now we’ll use the same settings that we used for the pretzel, and then we’ll just
duplicate those settings to decrease the number of particles. So let me go over to
the settings menu here and load in salt. And we’ll click on the plus sign to
create a group of settings all its own. And then we’ll decrease the number down
to something like 100. And let me press the Z key to go in wire-frame, just see
how scattered those particles look. And that actually looks good to me.
So let me press Z to go back in the shaded view. And there it is. Ladies and
gentlemen, we are finished our soft pretzel. So in the next video we’re going
to be going over shading and rendering, and just totally complete this. And,
that’s it. So I hope you enjoyed this video. I hope you learned a lot. If you
have any questions, you can leave them in the comments, or you can email me at
[email protected] So until the next video, I’ll see you around.

31 thoughts on “Making a 3D Pretzel – Part 1 – Blender for Beginners

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